Why is songwriting important?

We live in a time where sharing vulnerability and authentic truth is not encouraged. It is better to avoid pain or suffering and to keep it inside in a hidden place. Many of the individuals with whom I have written songs have told me they used to sing all the time as children until one day, they stopped.

In my work as a songwriting guide, I have heard many people express doubt that they know any stories from their life that are worthy of or interesting enough to become a song. I have also been told by dozens of songwriting participants that they cannot sing.

In sharing our stories, we discover that we are not alone in our life experiences, whether joyful or painful. We honor each life, and we find that there is common ground in our questions and struggles.

What I find most powerful about the STS method of songwriting is that it gives us permission to be our authentic selves. This process creates an opportunity for each person to experience their own creative voice and artistic potential and to have their story heard and valued. This method shows that community, empathy, and understanding can be created through the creative process.

It is my belief that every person is an artist, and it is my passion as a songwriter to work collaboratively with individuals wishing to experience the creative process, overcome grief or express joy, offer the gift of song to a loved one, or gain inspiration for their own musicianship and songwriting.

I believe that every person has a story and that this story will make a beautiful song that will speak to other people in a deep and meaningful way. Music is a form of expression beyond the spoken word that allows a person to communicate the raw and vulnerable moments that make up a human life. Having their story heard gives a person a sense that they have value and that they are not alone in whatever they have experienced in their life. Creating a song from their story can be healing and cathartic and may also help a person to process and find meaning from their lived experiences, both joyful and painful.